Living with water, 2018

By Anne Marie Kragh Pahuus*

After a couple of years in Aarhus, the American photographic artist Sarah Schorr has started to exhibit the work that she has produced out at Ballehage, just south of the city. Ballehage is home to one of several winter swimming clubs based along the coastline. Schorr’s brief photo captions reveal that her pictures are not just beautiful images of water as an element – they also depict the kind of time and space that can be created when we ignore the demands of our mobile phones. It’s true that mobile phones help to keep us connected and enable us to work wherever and whenever we like. However, Schorr is interested in exploring the way in which spaces that restrict the use of mobile phones give us the chance to return to our devices with more purpose. Her work focuses on living with water, water as an environment for physical experience, and the sense of caring and community that can arise when nature and the city combine. 

 

A lot of people agree that swimming in the winter months is healthy; but Sarah Schorr’s pictures may help us to understand exactly why swimming in cold seawater feels so good for the body, soul and spirit. Our bodies can sense the air, the waves, the current, the wind, and the play of light on the surface of the water. All this is important, of course. But the water, ice and sunlight shining on metal steps in winter are just as important – they expand our sense of time and space. Our bodies help us to understand that our environment consists of more than mere sensory impressions – just like the city, which consists of far more than the houses, shops, institutions and offices that it contains. The physical-objective world is not entirely absent from Sarah Schorr’s pictures: for instance, there’s a noticeboard showing the air and water temperature written in chalk. But these are not just figures on a board – we can’t help being reminded of the loving hands that wrote them, updating the noticeboard for the club members on a daily basis. You get the feeling that someone is looking after things, someone who really cares about other people. There’s a sense of communal pride in the place.

 

You can go swimming almost anywhere; and no matter where you live in Denmark, the sea is fortunately never very far away. But when you can go swimming by walking down a few steps leading from a jetty, and when you’ve got a sauna to enjoy after your dip, you just know that this is a place where people care about each other’s health and happiness. You don’t see any swimmers in Schorr’s pictures – there’s just one picture showing a bit of skin, a man’s chest with droplets of seawater, and some skin that’s had a close encounter with some pretty chilly water. It looks cold, but healthy. It’s rejuvenating, but ageless.

 

And yet the pictures are redolent of the sense of water. Our perception of water as an element has always been based on a holistic vision of Man as a combination of body, soul and spirit. These days we tend to talk about such issues in terms of mental health, discussing our constant search for the meaning of life and happiness. Swimming in the winter and the close proximity of the sea – is this why the Danes are regarded as such happy people? Perhaps the closeness of human relationships in Denmark is revealed in the trust we have for each other. And despite the fact that we aren’t particularly religious, perhaps we share the understanding that nature gives us gifts which nourish our souls and are worth taking good care of. Very few people think that nature has a soul; but as soon as you walk into the winter swimming club at Ballehage, you feel a sense of respect and caring for your immediate surroundings – just like the feeling you get when you enter your own home.

 

Water is everywhere: it’s in the rain, and we can drink it, swim in it and wash in it. We can even sail on it. But it’s also in our mother’s womb – it’s the liquid we come from and in which we are born. Water is regarded as holy in many cultures, and is always associated with purification, birth and renewal. And water is one of the four elements that have always been the basis of our lives: fire, earth, water and air. Chinese philosophy actually has a “Five Elements Theory” (wood, fire, earth, metal and water); but water is still one of them, being associated with female qualities. Water is also a basic element in Western philosophy. The Greek philosopher Empedocles created the cosmogenic theory of the four classical elements – thereby disagreeing with earlier natural philosophers, who believed that the whole of life was based on a single element. It was Empedocles who said that all matter was made up of four elements: fire, earth, water and air. Which is why the physicians of Antiquity said that these elements were present in the four bodily fluids or humours: fire in the form of yellow bile, earth in the form of black bile, water in the form of green phlegm, and air in the form of red blood coursing through our veins. These fluids and the balance between them were regarded as the reason why some people were choleric (too much yellow bile), some were melancholic (too much black bile), some were phlegmatic (too much green bile), and some were sanguine (too much red bile). And long before the archetypes and dream interpretations of modern psychoanalysis, learned scholars such as the Jesuit monk Lessius in the 17th century believed that the dreams of choleric individuals were full of fire, war and death – while melancholic people dreamt of being buried in the earth, coffins, flight and narrow passages; phlegmatic people dreamt of lakes, rivers, floods and shipwrecks; and sanguine people dreamt of being able to fly like a bird, of parties, games, and what Lessius referred to as “unmentionable” activities.

Water was traditionally associated with being on the move, with birth and new life, but also with the kind of challenges we feel when swimming against the tide or in waves that threaten to swallow us whole. All four elements have both good and bad sides. We dream of floating on air, of standing firm on the earth beneath us. And one of the greatest pleasures of the winter months is warming yourself in front of a cosy and crackling log fire. But we can also fall through the air, collapse onto the earth when our bones are utterly exhausted, and be consumed by violent forest fires.  

Water reminds us that we are at the mercy of the elements, too – we might drown and never reach the surface again. But more than anything else, we regard water as the giver of life, purifying us and wrapping itself around us. For instance, one of the best ways of relieving pain is to take a warm bath – it’s a useful technique for women in labour. Many women even choose to actually give birth to their babies under water.

In other words, whether we prefer it hot or cold, water is a source of physical pleasure. We can take to things like a duck to water, we can cast our bread on the waters, and when we feel awkward we feel like a fish out of water. And you can’t talk about water in Denmark without mentioning how much the Danes love the west coast of their beautiful country. After tramping through the sand dunes, you suddenly catch a glimpse of white horses riding the crests of huge waves along the line of the horizon. You can hear the distant roar of the North Sea. You can throw yourself into the waves, feel the water keeping you afloat, go for a swim, or take a rowing boat or kayak out beyond the breaking surf. Once you’ve mastered the necessary technique, skiing and ice skating can be great fun, too. After all, snow and ice are just different forms of frozen water – but they enable you to move in a way that far surpasses the sensation of running. 

It’s all a question of discovering the essence of water and experiencing its life, movement, resistance and buoyancy. All you have to do is leave your mobile on dry land, in your pocket, or on the kitchen table back home. Just let time and space expand around you. Start noticing things that you will never see on a screen: the sparkle of the sun on water, the rhythm of the waves, the perfect fractal patterns of the snowflakes, and the tightly packed formations of the ice. Even the onset of rain can teach you to rediscover the notion that everything is alive, reminding you that rain sounds like a whisper and a song – just like the start of Karen Blixen’s short story entitled Peter and Rosa (Winter’s Tales, 1957:174). Blixen describes a night when it started to rain after a whole week of raw, clinging fog. She describes the hard, merciless heavens above the dead landscape being shattered, dissolving into the flow of life and becoming one with the earth. And she comments on the unceasing whisper of falling water as it grows and turns into a song. As if the world was coming alive in the rain, drawing new breath in the dark.

When we go swimming, we don’t take our mobiles with us. We enter a heightened three-dimensional world just like the world of virtual reality. But by contrast with virtual reality, the sea allows us to retain all our senses – expanding our awareness of time and space, and giving free rein to our imaginations in a way that cannot be matched in the world of pure fantasy. We can be alone without being lonely. We can experience a sense of contemplation and calm even though we’re in the middle of a city. And we feel more alive. 

 

*Translation by Nicholas Wrigley


Om at leve med vand

Af Anne Marie Pahuus


Den amerikanske fotokunstner Sarah Schorr er efter et par år i byen begyndt at udstille sine fotografiske værker af Ballehage ved Aarhus. Ballehage er et af flere steder ved Aarhus’ kystlinje, hvor der er indrettet en vinterbadeklub. Det fremgår af Schorrs korte tekster til billederne, at billederne ud over at være smukke billeder af vandet som element også er billeder af en tid, der opstår i fraværet af kravet om at være tilgængelig og aktiv på mobiltelefonen. Hendes interesse er ikke mobilens muligheder, f.eks. at vi er socialt forbundne og kan arbejde uden at skulle flytte os efter det. Hendes blik er rettet på det levendegørende vand, vandet som en omgivelse for kropslig oplevelse og omhuen og fællesskabet i at have naturen i byen. 


Mange er enige om, at vinterbadning er sundt, men skal man forstå sundheden, skal man måske omvejen over Sarah Schorrs billeder og begribe, hvad det ret enkle møde med det kolde vand kan gøre for mennesker med både krop, sjæl og ånd. Selvfølgelig er kroppens og dens kredsløbs oplevelse af luften, bølgerne, strømmen, lysspillet i vandoverfladen og vinden vigtig, men udvidelsen af rummet med vandspejl, istapper og solblink i metaltrappen er mindst lige så vigtige. Af sanseindtrykkene ledes vi til en forståelse af omgivelserne som mere end sansepåvirkninger, ligesom byrum er mere end boliger, butikker, institutioner og kontorer. Den fysisk-objektive verden er til stede i Sarah Schorrs billeder som optegnelser af vand- og lufttemperatur noteret med kridt på tavle. Men optegnelserne er ikke kun de målbare temperaturforandringer, tallene henviser også til de hænder, der dagligt med omhu skriver temperaturen op for klubbens medlemmer. Man får en fornemmelse af, at der er nogen, der passer omhyggeligt på stedet for andres skyld. Det er en fælles omhu for et sted.


Man kunne gå i vandet alle steder. I Danmark er vi heldige at have havet inden for nogenlunde tæt rækkevidde næsten uanset, hvor vi bor. Men når der er adgang til havet fra mole og trappe og en sauna at gå ind i bagefter, er der mennesker, der kærer sig om andres sundhed og glæde. De badende er der ikke på Schorrs billeder, kun et enkelt billede af hud, et mandebryst med dråber af havvand og hud, der har mødt koldt vand. Det ser koldt, men sundt ud. Det er en fornyelse uden alder.


Alligevel er billederne fulde af oplevelsen af vand. Vandet som element har altid været forstået ud fra mennesket som en helhed af krop, sjæl og ånd. I dag ville vi nok tale om menneskers mentale sundhed eller om menneskets søgen efter mening og lykke. Er vinterbadet, havets nærhed – selv om det ikke er alles – en vej til at forstå, hvorfor danskere betragtes som et lykkeligt folk? Måske er der en nærhed i de menneskelige relationer, som viser sig i tilliden mellem mennesker; men som også viser sig i at vi, selv om vi generelt ikke er et særligt religiøst folkefærd, alligevel giver plads til en forståelse af, at naturen giver gaver, som vi åndeligt lever godt af, og som vi værdsætter og værner om. De færreste forstår naturen som besjælet, men respekten og omhuen for de nære omgivelser viser sig lige så snart man træder ind i vinterbadeklubben. Ligesom det også viser sig, når vi træder ind i dét, som vi kalder vores hjem.

 

Vandet forstået som element er regnen, det vand, vi drikker, det vi bader og svømmer i, sejler på, men det er også f.eks. fostervandet, som vi kommer af og er båret i ved livets begyndelse. Vandet er helligt i mange kulturer og alle steder forbindes det med renselse, fødsel og fornyelse. På den måde er vandet et af de fire elementer, som har optaget mennesker til alle tider: ild, jord, vand og luft. I kinesisk filosofi opererer man med fem grundelementer, men vandet er stadig et af dem og forstås som knyttet til det kvindelige. De fem elementer er træ, ild, jord, metal og vand. I vestlig filosofi er vandet også et grundstof, som den antikke filosof Empedokles udpegede blandt fire for at gøre op med tidligere naturfilosoffers idé om blot ét stof som grund til alt. Der er fire grundstoffer, forklarede Empedokles, ild, jord, vand og luft, som er i det hele. Derfor kunne datidens lægekunst også udpege dem i mennesket som værende til stede i de fire kropsvæsker, hvor ilden kunne genfindes i form af gul galde, jorden som kroppens sorte galde, vandet som slim og luften svarede til blodet, der strømmer i årene. Disse væsker og balancer mellem dem og ubalancerne i dem kunne forklare, at nogle mennesker blev kolerisk-opfarende (for meget gul galde), melankolsk-nedstemte (rigeligt af den sorte), flegmatisk-medfølende (slim i rigelige mængder) eller sangvinsk glade (blodgennemstrømning). Tilsvarende blev det længe før psykoanalysens arketyper og drømmetydninger beskrevet af klostrenes lærde, f.eks. Lessius i 1600-tallet, hvordan kolerikerens drømme vil være fuld af ild, brand, krig og død, melankolikerens af begravelser i jord, kister, flugt og snævre gange, flegmatikerens af søer, floder, oversvømmelser, skibbrud, mens den sangvinske ofte vil drømme om at kunne flyve som en fugl, om fest, spil og de ting, som jesuitermunken her betegner som ”unævnelige”.

Vandet er i den traditionelle lære om de fire elementer nært knyttet til det at være i bevægelse, til fødsel og nyt liv, men også til modstand som vi oplever det i strømmen og i bølgerne, der truer med at sluge os. Alle elementerne har både deres gode og mindre gode sider. Vi drømmer om at svæve i luften, om at stå fast og at sætte af fra den jord, der danner afsæt for suveræne spring, ligesom den største fornøjelse i vågen tilstand vinteren igennem dukker op, når ilden får fat mellem brændeknuderne efter en sløv start. Men luft, jord og ild er også at falde i luften, at trækkes ned mod jorden af trætte gamle knogler og de voldsomt hærgende ildebrande.  

Vandet kan derfor som element minde os om, at naturen kan gøre det af med os og at vi ikke kan komme op til overfladen. Men først og fremmest opfatter vi vandet som livgivende, som rensende og som omsluttende i en grad, hvor varmt vand f.eks. kan være den allerbedste smertelindring, f.eks. for den fødende kvinde. Mange får endda lov at føde deres babyer i vand på hospitalernes fødestuer.

Kropslig udfoldelse af den lykkelige slags oplever man tydeligst, når vandet på den måde er et godt element, uanset om man holder af det kolde eller det varme vand, altså når vi der kan føle os som ”en fisk i vandet”. Det er også mødet med havet, når man dukker op bag klittens marehalm og får øje på skumtoppene og horisontlinjen. Det er, når man kan høre Vesterhavets fjerne susen på afstand, når man dykker ned, mærker opdriften, svømmer, ror sin båd eller padler i sin kajak. Også skituren og skøjteturen er suveræne udfoldelser, når man først har fået det lært. Vand i form af sne og is tillader en type bevægelse, som løb ikke kan hamle op med. 

Det gælder så bare om at opdage vandet og opdage dets liv, bevægelse, modstand og bæreevne og lade mobilen blive på land, nede i lommen eller hjemme på bordet. Så kan tiden og rummet vide sig ud. Man kan begynde at lægge mærke til noget, der ikke vises på en skærm, solens blink i vandoverfladen, bølgernes rytme, snekrystallernes fine fraktalmønstre og isens pakkede formationer. Selv regnens komme kan blive stedet, hvor man kan genfinde ideen om, at alting lever, og at regnen lyder som hvisken og sang, sådan som Karen Blixen begynder sin novelle om Peter og Rosa: 

“Så en nat, efter en uge med rå og klam tåge, begyndte det at regne. Den hårde ubønhørlige himmel over det døde landskab brast, opløstes i strømmende liv og blev ét med jorden. Til alle sider genlød den uophørlige hvisken af faldende vand, den voksede og blev til en sang. Verden levede op under den, ting drog ånde inde i mørket” (Vintereventyr, 1957:174).


Når vi går i vandet, har vi ikke længere mobilen på os. Vi kan ligesom i virtual reality-computerverdenen gå ind i en tredimensionel verden, men i modsætning til Virtual Reality har vi ved havbadet alle sanser med, og netop derfor kan tid og rum vide sig ud og tankerne få frit løb på en måde som den rene fantasiverden ikke kan tilbyde os. Vi kan være alene uden at være ensomme. Vi kan opleve en fordybelse og ro midt i byen. Og opleve at være mere i live.

 

BLOG SECTIONS

Living With Water

Living with water, 2018

By Anne Marie Kragh Pahuus*

After a couple of years in Aarhus, the American photographic artist Sarah Schorr has started to exhibit the work that she has produced out at Ballehage, just south of the city. Ballehage is home to one of several winter swimming clubs based along the coastline. Schorr’s brief photo captions reveal that her pictures are not just beautiful images of water as an element – they also depict the kind of time and space that can be created when we ignore the demands of our mobile phones. It’s true that mobile phones help to keep us connected and enable us to work wherever and whenever we like. However, Schorr is interested in exploring the way in which spaces that restrict the use of mobile phones give us the chance to return to our devices with more purpose. Her work focuses on living with water, water as an environment for physical experience, and the sense of caring and community that can arise when nature and the city combine. 

 

A lot of people agree that swimming in the winter months is healthy; but Sarah Schorr’s pictures may help us to understand exactly why swimming in cold seawater feels so good for the body, soul and spirit. Our bodies can sense the air, the waves, the current, the wind, and the play of light on the surface of the water. All this is important, of course. But the water, ice and sunlight shining on metal steps in winter are just as important – they expand our sense of time and space. Our bodies help us to understand that our environment consists of more than mere sensory impressions – just like the city, which consists of far more than the houses, shops, institutions and offices that it contains. The physical-objective world is not entirely absent from Sarah Schorr’s pictures: for instance, there’s a noticeboard showing the air and water temperature written in chalk. But these are not just figures on a board – we can’t help being reminded of the loving hands that wrote them, updating the noticeboard for the club members on a daily basis. You get the feeling that someone is looking after things, someone who really cares about other people. There’s a sense of communal pride in the place.

 

You can go swimming almost anywhere; and no matter where you live in Denmark, the sea is fortunately never very far away. But when you can go swimming by walking down a few steps leading from a jetty, and when you’ve got a sauna to enjoy after your dip, you just know that this is a place where people care about each other’s health and happiness. You don’t see any swimmers in Schorr’s pictures – there’s just one picture showing a bit of skin, a man’s chest with droplets of seawater, and some skin that’s had a close encounter with some pretty chilly water. It looks cold, but healthy. It’s rejuvenating, but ageless.

 

And yet the pictures are redolent of the sense of water. Our perception of water as an element has always been based on a holistic vision of Man as a combination of body, soul and spirit. These days we tend to talk about such issues in terms of mental health, discussing our constant search for the meaning of life and happiness. Swimming in the winter and the close proximity of the sea – is this why the Danes are regarded as such happy people? Perhaps the closeness of human relationships in Denmark is revealed in the trust we have for each other. And despite the fact that we aren’t particularly religious, perhaps we share the understanding that nature gives us gifts which nourish our souls and are worth taking good care of. Very few people think that nature has a soul; but as soon as you walk into the winter swimming club at Ballehage, you feel a sense of respect and caring for your immediate surroundings – just like the feeling you get when you enter your own home.

 

Water is everywhere: it’s in the rain, and we can drink it, swim in it and wash in it. We can even sail on it. But it’s also in our mother’s womb – it’s the liquid we come from and in which we are born. Water is regarded as holy in many cultures, and is always associated with purification, birth and renewal. And water is one of the four elements that have always been the basis of our lives: fire, earth, water and air. Chinese philosophy actually has a “Five Elements Theory” (wood, fire, earth, metal and water); but water is still one of them, being associated with female qualities. Water is also a basic element in Western philosophy. The Greek philosopher Empedocles created the cosmogenic theory of the four classical elements – thereby disagreeing with earlier natural philosophers, who believed that the whole of life was based on a single element. It was Empedocles who said that all matter was made up of four elements: fire, earth, water and air. Which is why the physicians of Antiquity said that these elements were present in the four bodily fluids or humours: fire in the form of yellow bile, earth in the form of black bile, water in the form of green phlegm, and air in the form of red blood coursing through our veins. These fluids and the balance between them were regarded as the reason why some people were choleric (too much yellow bile), some were melancholic (too much black bile), some were phlegmatic (too much green bile), and some were sanguine (too much red bile). And long before the archetypes and dream interpretations of modern psychoanalysis, learned scholars such as the Jesuit monk Lessius in the 17th century believed that the dreams of choleric individuals were full of fire, war and death – while melancholic people dreamt of being buried in the earth, coffins, flight and narrow passages; phlegmatic people dreamt of lakes, rivers, floods and shipwrecks; and sanguine people dreamt of being able to fly like a bird, of parties, games, and what Lessius referred to as “unmentionable” activities.

Water was traditionally associated with being on the move, with birth and new life, but also with the kind of challenges we feel when swimming against the tide or in waves that threaten to swallow us whole. All four elements have both good and bad sides. We dream of floating on air, of standing firm on the earth beneath us. And one of the greatest pleasures of the winter months is warming yourself in front of a cosy and crackling log fire. But we can also fall through the air, collapse onto the earth when our bones are utterly exhausted, and be consumed by violent forest fires.  

Water reminds us that we are at the mercy of the elements, too – we might drown and never reach the surface again. But more than anything else, we regard water as the giver of life, purifying us and wrapping itself around us. For instance, one of the best ways of relieving pain is to take a warm bath – it’s a useful technique for women in labour. Many women even choose to actually give birth to their babies under water.

In other words, whether we prefer it hot or cold, water is a source of physical pleasure. We can take to things like a duck to water, we can cast our bread on the waters, and when we feel awkward we feel like a fish out of water. And you can’t talk about water in Denmark without mentioning how much the Danes love the west coast of their beautiful country. After tramping through the sand dunes, you suddenly catch a glimpse of white horses riding the crests of huge waves along the line of the horizon. You can hear the distant roar of the North Sea. You can throw yourself into the waves, feel the water keeping you afloat, go for a swim, or take a rowing boat or kayak out beyond the breaking surf. Once you’ve mastered the necessary technique, skiing and ice skating can be great fun, too. After all, snow and ice are just different forms of frozen water – but they enable you to move in a way that far surpasses the sensation of running. 

It’s all a question of discovering the essence of water and experiencing its life, movement, resistance and buoyancy. All you have to do is leave your mobile on dry land, in your pocket, or on the kitchen table back home. Just let time and space expand around you. Start noticing things that you will never see on a screen: the sparkle of the sun on water, the rhythm of the waves, the perfect fractal patterns of the snowflakes, and the tightly packed formations of the ice. Even the onset of rain can teach you to rediscover the notion that everything is alive, reminding you that rain sounds like a whisper and a song – just like the start of Karen Blixen’s short story entitled Peter and Rosa (Winter’s Tales, 1957:174). Blixen describes a night when it started to rain after a whole week of raw, clinging fog. She describes the hard, merciless heavens above the dead landscape being shattered, dissolving into the flow of life and becoming one with the earth. And she comments on the unceasing whisper of falling water as it grows and turns into a song. As if the world was coming alive in the rain, drawing new breath in the dark.

When we go swimming, we don’t take our mobiles with us. We enter a heightened three-dimensional world just like the world of virtual reality. But by contrast with virtual reality, the sea allows us to retain all our senses – expanding our awareness of time and space, and giving free rein to our imaginations in a way that cannot be matched in the world of pure fantasy. We can be alone without being lonely. We can experience a sense of contemplation and calm even though we’re in the middle of a city. And we feel more alive. 

 

*Translation by Nicholas Wrigley


Om at leve med vand

Af Anne Marie Pahuus


Den amerikanske fotokunstner Sarah Schorr er efter et par år i byen begyndt at udstille sine fotografiske værker af Ballehage ved Aarhus. Ballehage er et af flere steder ved Aarhus’ kystlinje, hvor der er indrettet en vinterbadeklub. Det fremgår af Schorrs korte tekster til billederne, at billederne ud over at være smukke billeder af vandet som element også er billeder af en tid, der opstår i fraværet af kravet om at være tilgængelig og aktiv på mobiltelefonen. Hendes interesse er ikke mobilens muligheder, f.eks. at vi er socialt forbundne og kan arbejde uden at skulle flytte os efter det. Hendes blik er rettet på det levendegørende vand, vandet som en omgivelse for kropslig oplevelse og omhuen og fællesskabet i at have naturen i byen. 


Mange er enige om, at vinterbadning er sundt, men skal man forstå sundheden, skal man måske omvejen over Sarah Schorrs billeder og begribe, hvad det ret enkle møde med det kolde vand kan gøre for mennesker med både krop, sjæl og ånd. Selvfølgelig er kroppens og dens kredsløbs oplevelse af luften, bølgerne, strømmen, lysspillet i vandoverfladen og vinden vigtig, men udvidelsen af rummet med vandspejl, istapper og solblink i metaltrappen er mindst lige så vigtige. Af sanseindtrykkene ledes vi til en forståelse af omgivelserne som mere end sansepåvirkninger, ligesom byrum er mere end boliger, butikker, institutioner og kontorer. Den fysisk-objektive verden er til stede i Sarah Schorrs billeder som optegnelser af vand- og lufttemperatur noteret med kridt på tavle. Men optegnelserne er ikke kun de målbare temperaturforandringer, tallene henviser også til de hænder, der dagligt med omhu skriver temperaturen op for klubbens medlemmer. Man får en fornemmelse af, at der er nogen, der passer omhyggeligt på stedet for andres skyld. Det er en fælles omhu for et sted.


Man kunne gå i vandet alle steder. I Danmark er vi heldige at have havet inden for nogenlunde tæt rækkevidde næsten uanset, hvor vi bor. Men når der er adgang til havet fra mole og trappe og en sauna at gå ind i bagefter, er der mennesker, der kærer sig om andres sundhed og glæde. De badende er der ikke på Schorrs billeder, kun et enkelt billede af hud, et mandebryst med dråber af havvand og hud, der har mødt koldt vand. Det ser koldt, men sundt ud. Det er en fornyelse uden alder.


Alligevel er billederne fulde af oplevelsen af vand. Vandet som element har altid været forstået ud fra mennesket som en helhed af krop, sjæl og ånd. I dag ville vi nok tale om menneskers mentale sundhed eller om menneskets søgen efter mening og lykke. Er vinterbadet, havets nærhed – selv om det ikke er alles – en vej til at forstå, hvorfor danskere betragtes som et lykkeligt folk? Måske er der en nærhed i de menneskelige relationer, som viser sig i tilliden mellem mennesker; men som også viser sig i at vi, selv om vi generelt ikke er et særligt religiøst folkefærd, alligevel giver plads til en forståelse af, at naturen giver gaver, som vi åndeligt lever godt af, og som vi værdsætter og værner om. De færreste forstår naturen som besjælet, men respekten og omhuen for de nære omgivelser viser sig lige så snart man træder ind i vinterbadeklubben. Ligesom det også viser sig, når vi træder ind i dét, som vi kalder vores hjem.

 

Vandet forstået som element er regnen, det vand, vi drikker, det vi bader og svømmer i, sejler på, men det er også f.eks. fostervandet, som vi kommer af og er båret i ved livets begyndelse. Vandet er helligt i mange kulturer og alle steder forbindes det med renselse, fødsel og fornyelse. På den måde er vandet et af de fire elementer, som har optaget mennesker til alle tider: ild, jord, vand og luft. I kinesisk filosofi opererer man med fem grundelementer, men vandet er stadig et af dem og forstås som knyttet til det kvindelige. De fem elementer er træ, ild, jord, metal og vand. I vestlig filosofi er vandet også et grundstof, som den antikke filosof Empedokles udpegede blandt fire for at gøre op med tidligere naturfilosoffers idé om blot ét stof som grund til alt. Der er fire grundstoffer, forklarede Empedokles, ild, jord, vand og luft, som er i det hele. Derfor kunne datidens lægekunst også udpege dem i mennesket som værende til stede i de fire kropsvæsker, hvor ilden kunne genfindes i form af gul galde, jorden som kroppens sorte galde, vandet som slim og luften svarede til blodet, der strømmer i årene. Disse væsker og balancer mellem dem og ubalancerne i dem kunne forklare, at nogle mennesker blev kolerisk-opfarende (for meget gul galde), melankolsk-nedstemte (rigeligt af den sorte), flegmatisk-medfølende (slim i rigelige mængder) eller sangvinsk glade (blodgennemstrømning). Tilsvarende blev det længe før psykoanalysens arketyper og drømmetydninger beskrevet af klostrenes lærde, f.eks. Lessius i 1600-tallet, hvordan kolerikerens drømme vil være fuld af ild, brand, krig og død, melankolikerens af begravelser i jord, kister, flugt og snævre gange, flegmatikerens af søer, floder, oversvømmelser, skibbrud, mens den sangvinske ofte vil drømme om at kunne flyve som en fugl, om fest, spil og de ting, som jesuitermunken her betegner som ”unævnelige”.

Vandet er i den traditionelle lære om de fire elementer nært knyttet til det at være i bevægelse, til fødsel og nyt liv, men også til modstand som vi oplever det i strømmen og i bølgerne, der truer med at sluge os. Alle elementerne har både deres gode og mindre gode sider. Vi drømmer om at svæve i luften, om at stå fast og at sætte af fra den jord, der danner afsæt for suveræne spring, ligesom den største fornøjelse i vågen tilstand vinteren igennem dukker op, når ilden får fat mellem brændeknuderne efter en sløv start. Men luft, jord og ild er også at falde i luften, at trækkes ned mod jorden af trætte gamle knogler og de voldsomt hærgende ildebrande.  

Vandet kan derfor som element minde os om, at naturen kan gøre det af med os og at vi ikke kan komme op til overfladen. Men først og fremmest opfatter vi vandet som livgivende, som rensende og som omsluttende i en grad, hvor varmt vand f.eks. kan være den allerbedste smertelindring, f.eks. for den fødende kvinde. Mange får endda lov at føde deres babyer i vand på hospitalernes fødestuer.

Kropslig udfoldelse af den lykkelige slags oplever man tydeligst, når vandet på den måde er et godt element, uanset om man holder af det kolde eller det varme vand, altså når vi der kan føle os som ”en fisk i vandet”. Det er også mødet med havet, når man dukker op bag klittens marehalm og får øje på skumtoppene og horisontlinjen. Det er, når man kan høre Vesterhavets fjerne susen på afstand, når man dykker ned, mærker opdriften, svømmer, ror sin båd eller padler i sin kajak. Også skituren og skøjteturen er suveræne udfoldelser, når man først har fået det lært. Vand i form af sne og is tillader en type bevægelse, som løb ikke kan hamle op med. 

Det gælder så bare om at opdage vandet og opdage dets liv, bevægelse, modstand og bæreevne og lade mobilen blive på land, nede i lommen eller hjemme på bordet. Så kan tiden og rummet vide sig ud. Man kan begynde at lægge mærke til noget, der ikke vises på en skærm, solens blink i vandoverfladen, bølgernes rytme, snekrystallernes fine fraktalmønstre og isens pakkede formationer. Selv regnens komme kan blive stedet, hvor man kan genfinde ideen om, at alting lever, og at regnen lyder som hvisken og sang, sådan som Karen Blixen begynder sin novelle om Peter og Rosa: 

“Så en nat, efter en uge med rå og klam tåge, begyndte det at regne. Den hårde ubønhørlige himmel over det døde landskab brast, opløstes i strømmende liv og blev ét med jorden. Til alle sider genlød den uophørlige hvisken af faldende vand, den voksede og blev til en sang. Verden levede op under den, ting drog ånde inde i mørket” (Vintereventyr, 1957:174).


Når vi går i vandet, har vi ikke længere mobilen på os. Vi kan ligesom i virtual reality-computerverdenen gå ind i en tredimensionel verden, men i modsætning til Virtual Reality har vi ved havbadet alle sanser med, og netop derfor kan tid og rum vide sig ud og tankerne få frit løb på en måde som den rene fantasiverden ikke kan tilbyde os. Vi kan være alene uden at være ensomme. Vi kan opleve en fordybelse og ro midt i byen. Og opleve at være mere i live.

 

BLOG SECTIONS